The Fabulous Mercer Cars - Art

Mercer was an American car manufactured from 1909 until 1925. It was notable for its high-performance, especially the Type 35 Raceabout . Ferdinand Roebling, son of John A. Roebling, was the president, and his nephew Washington A. Roebling II was the general manager. The secretary-treasurer was John L. Kuser. Named after Mercer County, New Jersey. Talented designers and race drivers contributed to the effort, and the focus became proving their product in competition. The result was one of the most admired sports cars of the decade; the 1910 Type-35R Raceabout, a stripped-down, two-seat speedster, designed to be "safely and consistently" driven at over 70 mph (110 km/h). It was capable of over 90 mph (140 km/h).[citation needed] The Raceabout's inline 4-cylinder T-head engine displaced 293 cubic inches (4,800 cc) and developed 55 horsepower (41 kW) at 1,650 revolutions per minute.[4] It won five of the six 1911 races it was entered in, losing only the first Indianapolis 500 The Raceabout became one of the premier racing thoroughbreds of the era- highly coveted for its quality construction and exceptional handling In February 1914, Eddie Pullen, who worked at the factory from 1910, won the American Grand Prize held at Santa Monica, California, by racing for 403 mi (649 km) in a Raceabout. Later that same year, Eddie also won The Corona Road Race held in Corona, California. On November 26 he set a new world road race record. His average speed of 86.5 mph (139.21 km/h) broke the record of 78.72 mph (126.69 km/h) set by Teddy Tetzlaff at Santa Monica in 1912

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